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2 edition of Sweeteners and dental caries found in the catalog.

Sweeteners and dental caries

Conference on Sweeteners and Dental Caries New England Center for Continuing Education 1977

Sweeteners and dental caries

proceedings of a workshop on evaluation of available and potential new sweeteners as sugar substitutes in development of non-cariogenic foods and beverages, October 24-26, 1977, New England Center for Continuing Education, Durham, New England

by Conference on Sweeteners and Dental Caries New England Center for Continuing Education 1977

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Published by Information Retrieval in Washington, D.C .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementedited by James H. Shaw and Gerassimos G. Roussos.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14796933M

First published in , Dental Caries: The Disease and Its Clinical Management has become the leading resource on cariology. In this highly anticipated new edition, the editors maintain the same focus on high-level coverage of the disease etiology and process, clinical management best-practice, and wider public health issues connected with dental caries management, including an enhanced focus.   Evidence of the effect of xylitol and other sweeteners on dental caries comes from many different types of study — laboratory incubation experiments, in vivo plaque pH and enamel slab caries Cited by:

Dextrose is a fermentable carbohydrate, and maltodextrin is a starch with cariogenic potential Touger-Decker R, van Loveren C. Sugars and dental caries. Am J Clin Nutr ;78(4)SS., 25 Rezende G, Hashizume LN. Maltodextrin and dental caries: a literature review. Rev Gaúch Odontol ;66(3)   Guideline on Xylitol Use in Caries xylitol is incorporated into the cells of MS as xylitolphosphate, through the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system. This results in inhibition of both growth and acid production. Nayak et al.()The effect of xylitol on dental caries .

They were believed to cause health problems, including cancer, dental caries, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The alternative sweeteners can rapidly increase the blood sugar level and cause deleterious effects in diabetic patients (Findikli and Turkoglu, ). The other group of sweeteners, i.e., bulk sweeteners, are less sweet than sucrose.   Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that is caused by an interplay of three major factors, i.e., teeth, cariogenic bacteria, and fermentable sugars. Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus, collectively termed mutans streptococci (MS), are principal causative agents of dental caries. Initial MS-tooth surface attachment is followed by firm and irreversible adhesion of MS to the tooth surface Cited by:


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Sweeteners and dental caries by Conference on Sweeteners and Dental Caries New England Center for Continuing Education 1977 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sweeteners and dental caries (tooth decay) The Sweeteners Carbohydrates (Sugars) Sucrose Brown sugar, turbinado, molasses Fructose Glucose Lactose Isomaltulose Corn syrup High fructose corn syrup Honey Agave nectar Sugar alcohols (Polyols) Sorbitol Isomalt Lactitol Maltitol Mannitol Xylitol Inulin and fructooligosaccharides Tagatose Erythritol Glycerol High potency sweeteners Acesulfame potassium.

Dental J. ()]. Bacteria in the mouth normally utilize sugars to make insoluble glucan, which adheres to teeth. They also produce acids, which can dissolve calcium and phosphate in.

2 Dental Health 27 Anne Maguire. Introduction Dental caries Reduced-calorie bulk sweeteners High-potency (high-intensity) sweeteners Bulking agents Summary 3 Digestive Health 63 Henna Roytio, Kirsti Tiihonen and Arthur C. Ouwehand. Introduction; prebiotics, sweeteners and gut health Ly et al.

Xylitol, Sweeteners, and Dental Caries Pediatric Dentistry – Xylitol is a sugar substitute with sweetness equal to that of table sugar (sucrose), but with 40% fewer calories.1 It is a member of the sugar alcohol or polyol family, which includes other common dietary.

This has led to an increasing proportion of caries-free individuals and to improved dental health. However, recent epidemiological data show that caries continues to be a problem in adult populations, where about 10–15% may still be considered at high risk of by: Sucrose – the most widely consumed sweetener in the world – has been criticized for many years for its contribution to obesity, dental caries and other diseases.

While glucose and fructose syrups are widely used to replace sucrose in food, many of the problems associated with ‘sugar’ consumption remain.5/5(1).

Sugars and Sweeteners is a comprehensive volume examining the supposed role of sugar as a causative agent in hyperactivity, coronary artery disease, diabetes, dental caries, and other afflictions, as well as the chemistry of sugar and the metabolism of 3/5(2).

Xylitol, Sweeteners, and Dental Caries Article Literature Review in Pediatric dentistry 28(2); discussion March with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month of results for Books: Medical Books: Dentistry: Caries Strictly No Elephants.

Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme SDcep Prevention and Management of Dental Caries in Children Guidance in Brief April DENTAL CARIES A5 1 22/03/ Xylitol, like other polyol sweeteners, is a naturally occurring sugar alcohol.

Studies suggest polyols are noncariogenic. Furthermore, studies indicate that xylitol can decrease mutans streptococci levels in plaque and saliva and can reduce dental caries in young children, mothers, and in.

The second edition of Dental Caries: the Disease and its Clinical Management builds on the success of the prestigious first edition to present an unrivaled resource on cariology.

The clinical thrust of the first edition is widened and strengthened to include coverage of the disease in all its variety, from eruption of the first primary tooth to the prevalent forms of the disease in older patients.

Dental caries has a multifactorial aetiology in which there is interplay of three principal factors: the host (saliva and teeth), the microflora (plaque), and the substrate (diet), and a fourth.

Sugar, Artificial Sweeteners and Tooth Decay - Sweet. Home > Dental Education Articles > Sugar By Dr. David Leader There are many options available to sweeten a cup of coffee or a bowl of breakfast cereal. Parents, who are careful enough to read the list of ingredients on a breakfast bar or a cold drink, may be l.

Rural, isolated areas benefit less from caries prevention programs and access to treatment than urban areas, and, hence, differences in oral health can be expected.

This study aims to assess the prevalence of caries and malocclusion in urban and rural areas of Peru and to compare them with patients’ oral health perception. A total of adolescents were examined in five schools of rural Author: Maria Cadenas de Llano-Pérula, Estela Ricse, Steffen Fieuws, Guy Willems, Maria Fernanda Orellana-Va.

Get this from a library. Sweeteners and dental caries: a special supplement to feeding, weight & obesity abstracts: proceedings of a workshop on evaluation of available and potential new sweeteners as sugar substitutes in development of non-cariogenic foods and beverages, October, the New England Center for Continuing Education, Durham, New England.

Part 1. Introduction to oral diagnosis and treatment planning. Part 2. Dental caries and assessment of risk. Part 3. Periodontal disease and assessment of riskCited by: 8. Indeed, dental caries research involving polyols other than sorbitol or xylitol is sparse and has often involved the use of animal models or has employed a combination of polyols in the study products.

Nevertheless, the literature overwhelmingly supports their low fermentation by mutans streptococci and thus low-acidogenic potential and low- to Cited by: 1.

This book aims to define the etiological factors in dental caries and to guide the clinician towards methods of caries prevention that are evidence based. The coverage includes discussion of the active role of the biofilm and the oral environment and emphasizes the multifactorial etiology of dental.

Ten percent sucrose and % NaCl were used as caries-positive and caries-negative controls, respectively. Slabs/biofilms were exposed to the sweeteners three times per day for 5min each time.

After 5 days, biofilms were recovered to determine: biomass, bacterial counts and intra- Cited by:. Comprehensive Preventive Dentistry is grounded in a patient-centered, pre-emptive, and minimally invasive philosophy.

The book begins by covering individual diseases, such as caries, periodontitis, and oral cancer, as well as therapies (sealants, fluoride) and other relevant conditions (toothwear, hypersensitivity). (b) Significance of the relationship between noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners and dental caries.

Noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners do not promote dental caries. The noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners listed in paragraph (c)(2)(ii) of this section are slowly metabolized by bacteria to form some acid.

Intense sweeteners are not metabolized to acids by oral microorganisms; thus they cannot cause dental caries. However, it is important to remember that other ingredients, such as citric or phosphoric acids in beverages, may cause dental by: